It is currently Sat Aug 19, 2017 7:08 pm 






Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

Previous topic | Next topic 

  Print view

Author Message
User avatar  Offline
West Coast Angler Team
West Coast Angler Team
 
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:50 am
Posts: 77
Location: Miami, FL
 Post subject: Pavon fishing
PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 2:25 pm 
Seeing those photos of largies in Kali reminded me of a report I received about a month ago from my friend Steve Shoulders in Venezuela. This is probably the only forum I didn't post it:

"Salutations from Lake Guri:

The story I am about to tell you was told to me by a local Pemon Indian from the village across the La Paragua River from the HFC camp. There was another Indian present during the telling of this tale, and he says that it is true. You be your own judge.

It seems that one day while in search of food for his family, Richard, who is the Indian in question, was fishing along the bank of the La Paragua River with his Indian friend, Jose. They were trying to catch an Amara, which is a large Amazonian fish that grows in excess of 50 lbs, and has teeth like a shark. They were using pieces of cut up piranha for bait, and for the first few hours their effort had proved fruitless. Don’t believe me, just ask Al at South Fishing….he can tell you!

Then about mid morning, Richard felt a sudden yank on his line, as something took the bait into its mouth. Having quickly retrieved all the slack line, Richard wrapped the 70 lb monofilament line around his hand and proceeded to set the hook as hard as he could into whatever had taken his bait. In the blink of an eye, the line began ripping off toward the depths through Richard's cut and bleeding fingers, but he didn't let go, because this was the way Indians had caught fish for centuries. As the big fish continued to pull more line into the water, the dugout canoe the Indians were using was slowly being towed out into the river channel away from the protection of the shoreline. Still, Richard and Jose continued with an age old practice of letting the big fish fight itself down before even attempting to land it.

Then something strange happened. Both Indians were well aware that the big river fish invariably head for the depths of the river channel to do their fight, which is why they were shocked to see this fish reverse course and head for the shoreline again. As the dugout reached a point not fifteen feet from the bank, Richard watched helplessly as the line began to rise rapidly for the surface. This also was odd, because both men knew Amara seldom if ever come to the surface when fighting. Well, this one was coming up, and it was coming up fast.

Then the monster size fish broke the calm surface of the river, as it shot skyward in a heart stopping leap. Richard and Jose were also immediately aware of the fact they were not fighting a big Amara, but a peacock bass of truly gigantic proportions. Never before had either man seen a fish of this species that big, much less had a chance to land one.

Jose quickly removed his t-shirt and gave it to Richard to use as a protective covering for his lacerated hands, and the battle continued unabated with the fish taking out yards of line only to be pulled slowly back towards the boat inch by inch. With the muscles of his arms and back screaming for relief, and blood from his hands dripping into the bottom of the dugout, Richard took time to thank the river 'God' for the chance to fight the grandfather of all peacock bass, and promised to pay special respect when it was over. But the fight was long from over, as the big fish made powerful runs around and under their dugout.


Then suddenly, the fish rose to the surface not ten feet from the boat, and just hung there on the surface staring deep into Richard's eyes. Richard says he thought the fish was trying to talk to him, but he could not understand it. All he knew was that this fish was huge by anyone's calculations, and this fish was soon to be his family's food for the coming days. Such was the way of the Indian.

Having recovered some of its energy while staring at Richard, the big fish began to jump, dive, run under the boat, run around the boat, and make more short powerful runs for the river channel. Throughout all of this, Richard held on for dear life. Then just as he began to slowly but surely drew the fish near enough to the boat to allow Jose to grab it by the tail - the unthinkable happened. The fish made one more might turn causing the steel fish hook to straighten out, and the monster fish, now free of restraints, slowly sank back to the depths from which it had come.

Now you or I would have been traumatized by this terrible turn of events, but Richard merely said a quick thank you to the river 'God' for having been given the chance to witness such fish. Then he and Jose began to discuss what had just taken place, and they both decided this fish must have been at least 15 kilos in weight. Neither man had seen a fish near that big before, but hopefully they would again sometime in the future.

Friends, these events did not take place like ten years ago, but two weeks ago very near the area we are currently fishing with our clients. I wish I could tell you that we could put each and every one of you on such a fish to fight, but we can't. We do know fish similar to it are there for those anglers lucky enough to have a chance at them.

This past weekend HFC had a group of anglers arrive for the first ever trip to our camp, and hopefully it won't be the last. Lead by the father, Peter Bradley, there were also his sons, Peter Jr., Paul, and Michael, their cousin, Guillermo Katz, their charter pilot and HFC veteran, Jacobo Reyes, and his aircraft mechanic, Enrique. Michael and Guillermo had never fished before in their lives for anything, so they were in for a special treat.

The first fish Guillermo had ever caught in his life was an 11 lb beauty landed fifteen minutes after starting to fish. Michael, who didn't have Guillermo's luck, still boated 8 fish up to 8 lbs the first session, and lost several others. Peter Bradley Jr. led all fishermen the first session with a 13lb chunk of peacock bass.

On the second day of fishing, Peter Sr. hook and fought a truly giant peacock bass, only to have it tear loose under the boat after having battled with this beast for five minutes. Yozuris and Rapalas in the 4-5 inch models were the primary baits used, but Jumpin Minnows and Super spooks also boated some quality fish up to 13 lbs. The fish were coming up´and slapping at the prop baits, but for some crazy reason they would not take them in their mouths. All in all, this group boated in excess of 200 peacock bass with a good percentage of them 8 lbs or larger.

We are still fishing our newfound area upriver form the camp with great success, and with the seasonal rains beginning any day, this area will only get better. Payara fishing has been slow to date, but with the rains beginning that will change dramatically, so get you spinnerbaits ready.

Folks, as good as our fishing has been the past few months, the prime time for big péacock bass is now upon us. For the next few months, top-water action will be plentiful, and this is when a man can make his fishing dreams come true. Don't be left out on the action, because all it takes is for you to drop South Fishing an email stating your preferred dates and number of people in your group, and I will do what I can to help you plan a trip of a lifetime.

We are open year-round, except Christmas and New Years. After all we need some time with family too.

Regards,

Steve Shoulders Headwaters Fishing Club,
Lake Guri, Venezuela"

_________________
Al Schaefer
un-employed world angler


Top
 Profile  
 
User avatar  Offline
West Coast Angler Team
West Coast Angler Team
 
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:50 am
Posts: 77
Location: Miami, FL
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 1:58 pm 
04 Oct - Greetings Fisherpersons (being pc these days)

I just spent five of the most enjoyable days fishing with Lance Cornell and Charlie Mercer, who were down here from Mt Vernon, Texas. Throughout there trip, the water level fell steadily at a rate of 4 inches a day. Falling water cause the big fish to pull back into the deep channels for protection, so topwater action in the shallows was spotty at best. In their five days here, the two of them only landed six fish over ten pounds fishing topwater baits, but don't go feeling sorry for them, because what they did using deeper baits will make you jealous.

After having boated only two big fish their first day at the camp, we sat down over cocktails that evening and came up with a different strategy. That strategy was to fish down 8-12 ft in the river and creek channels, and this was the beginning of a great fishing trip.

Using Spinnerbaits and deep diving minnow type baits the two of them started landing big fish after big fish. Just to show you how they did, here is a summary of their catch.

one 15 lbs
five 13 lbs
seven 12 lbs
six 11 lbs
ten 10 lbs
thirteen 8-9 lbs

When they got tired of fighting big peacock bass, they would troll certain prime areas for payara, which produced ten payara from 10-16 lbs. Be pretty hard to tell these fellas they had a bad trip.

As I said earlier, the water is continuing to fall steadily, and it looks like we are in for an extended dry season this year. That in itself is not bad news, because each time in the past this has happened, we catch lots of trophy fish close to the camp, because the falling water upriver forces the peacock bass and payara population downriver to us.

We have lots of openings throughout the coming months, so this is the time to get with your friends and plan a fishing trip of a lifetime with us at HFC. It doesn't matter if you are a novice or a professional, because at HFC everyone catches fish.

Everyone have a GREAT week!!!!

Regards,

Steve Shoulders
Headwaters Fishing Club,
Guri Lake, VEN

_________________
Al Schaefer
un-employed world angler


Top
 Profile  
 
User avatar  Offline
West Coast Angler Team
West Coast Angler Team
 
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:50 am
Posts: 77
Location: Miami, FL
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 1:04 pm 
20 October 2009

Greetings Anglers,

This past week was really special for me, because I got to spend the entire week with one of all time favorite group of men, which were seven members of the based Mantech Corp. This group has been to HFC several times in the past, and each visit has been marked by numerous moments of some serious competitive discussions, hilarious comments, and up until this trip, predictable winners.


In the many emails I sent them in preparation for the trip, my main topic was the fact we were catching the fish in deeper than normal water along the river banks upriver from the camp, which was true. When they arrived, what they found was high winds blowing directly up the river, which meant we couldn't fish any of our prime spots due to high waves. Undeterred by this unusual phenomena of nature, the men all began working Woodchoppers and Super Spooks in the shallow water of the coves near the camp. Keeping in mind that for the past month we have been catching the big majority of our trophy fish in 10-15 ft of water, you can imagine how surprised my guides and I were to have huge fish blasting lures in less than 2 ft of water.


One reason for this unusual development was the secondary spawn we have in this area every September and October, but it usually occurs with the water rising. This year our rains stopped in late August, and the water level has been steadily falling 4" a day since. We are now at 12 ft low and going down, which means to us that this coming year we will be fishing the areas not fished since the year 2001, which is when the lake went down more than 90 feet! Does anyone remember the "Glory Hole" fishing area, because it appears this famous HFC fishing hole will come alive again in early 2010?


Well, the fun loving Mantech gang went after the fish in the shallows, and some experienced the thrill of victory, while others only the agony of defeat. When you hook a big peacock bass in a foot of water, and it can't dive for the protection of the depths, the only alternative is to hit afterburner and plow furiously across the flats in an effort to escape. This means of fighting causes one to rethink your fishing tactics. Where you would normally use a firm drag, a medium set drag in the flats is preferable, because straightened hooks and broken lines will quickly remind you to loosen off on the drag.


The Mantech Marauders were led by "El Jefe", Rick Urban, who had won big fish prize the last two trips to HFC, along with Fred Scruggs, Bruce Minger, Walter Ahern, Mike Friend, Jeff Naum, and last but defintely not least the former wild man himself, Larry Quijas. It was Larry, who while fishing early in the week with Rick, that caught the big fish of the week, which was a 15 lb beauty. Rick claims Larry is low down, fish stealing rascal that threw over and caught the big fish that he had just raised but failed to get hooked up with. Larry, on the other hand, claims it was superior skill and knowledge that triumphed that day. I referred to Larry as the former wild man, because someone has been feeding that man Prozac or something, since the Larry that showed up this trip was a complete opposite from the Larry I knew and enjoyed in the past. I personally think it was Walter that has caused this transformation in Larry. I have included a photo of Rick begrudgingly presenting Larry with his prize money for having landed the big peacock bass of the trip.


The entire group managed to land one 15 lbs, one 14 lbs, three 13 lbs, three 12 lbs, three 12 lbs, and eight 10 lbs for a grand total of nineteen peacock bass over 10 lbs. The unfortunate part of the week was the fact they hooked, fought, and then lost that many or more for various reasons. Had it not been for the 20-25 mph winds, this group would have done much better. Mike Friend won the money for big payara landed with a 15 lb string stretcher. The prime lures were the 3/4 oz Woodchopper Peacock Bass Specials with double blades, Pavon Props 6" or 7" fire-tiger patterned bait, Super Spooks in a variety of colors, and the ever faithful white, 1/2 oz spinnerbaits with gold willow leaf blades.


I think I am safe in saying that for the next year Mike Friend will be having recurring nightmares about the 20 lb+ peacock bass he fought for over five minutes, got near the boat twice so that everyone could get a good look at it's monstrous size, and then see it pull free at the end and swim away. If I am not mistaken, Rick Urban suffered the same fate on another monster size fish later in the week.


As I said earlier in the report, our water level is in a steady fall, and I see very little chance of this changing until next rainy season in June of 2010. The falling water levels will force the fish that are currently living upriver to migrate back down near the HFC headquarters camp. It sure makes it easy on the fishermen to be able to go less than fifteen minutes from the camp to make their fishing dreams come true. No matter where they go, our experienced guides at HFC know where the fish will be depending on where the water level is at the time of your trip, so don't worry about that.


Friends, we have openings available over the next few months, which is our prime fishing season, so don't miss out on your chance to make your fishing dreams come true. Be you a novice or expert fisherman, our guides will make sure they adapt the fishing to match your abilities, which translates into a great fishing experience for all. Just drop Al Schaefer <al@southfishing.com> an email or give them a call to help set up a trip for you and your friends or family.


Regards,


Steve Shoulders

_________________
Al Schaefer
un-employed world angler


Top
 Profile  
 
User avatar  Offline
West Coast Angler Team
West Coast Angler Team
 
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:50 am
Posts: 77
Location: Miami, FL
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 4:32 pm 
[i]11 November 2009

Greetings Fisherpeople,

To only refer to this past few days as interesting or enjoyable would be doing a great injustice to some downright hilarious high jinks by my fun loving guests, Jay Roff, Diego Roff, Tod Emerson, Jay Thompson, Don Nachels, and Jarrad Rebich. It is due to the actions of men like these that I can write some extremely interesting fishing reports, and I thank them for all the new stories I now have to tell my clients over cocktails.

Having travelled down from Houston on the overnight red-eye flight, they seemed to be in high spirits upon arrival at the HFC camp that afternoon. Perhaps they were just naturally happy people, or perhaps the eight hours they spent in various airport bars, vans, and boats during their journey brought on the very noticeable glow they projected. As the first night grew late, their glow increased, and someone came up with the absolutely astonishing idea of going gator grabbing. Even more astonishing is the fact I agreed to allow them to do it, and ordered HFC guide, Alejito, to bring his boat around.

Gathering up all the flashlights, spotlights, and cigarette lighters available in the camp, this band of very merry men began their adventure. There was an air of excitement as they slowly eased along the shoreline in search of their prey, which was a species of alligator called a "baba" by the locals. The fine, yet occasionally dangerous, art of gator grabbing started at HFC some fourteen years ago when three seemingly intelligent men got drunk and decided they just had to get themselves a gator, which amazingly they did without losing any body parts of their own. I was optimistic these new gator aficionados would be equally lucky, but I did order my staff to keep the first aid kit handy just in case.

Undoubtedly, one the finest feats of gator grabbing ever witnessed was performed by Don Nachels, who will forever be know to everyone as "Matababa", which loosely translates to mean gator killer. Well “Matbabaâ€

_________________
Al Schaefer
un-employed world angler


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:

Who is online

In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)
Most users ever online was 227 on Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:12 am

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest





cron

© 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 West Coast Angler

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

Style based on Andreas08 by Andreas Viklund

Tweaked by West Coast Angler